Category Archives: Interview

Interview – Founder of SensoMind, Rufus Blas

We love the new technologies here at MyFoodTrust, of course in relation to improving the current lack of transparency. Last week we talked to Daniel from Bext360, and their use of blockchain and AI. Today we focus on AI again, which we find super interesting as a tool for food transparency, so it was a no brainer to do a interview with Rufus from SensoMind.

Read here, how SensoMind have applied AI to create a system to detect anomalies in food products and what role AI will play in creating transparency in food supply chains in the future.

Can you start with telling us a little about yourself and SensoMind?Hi, my name is Rufus. I’ve been involved in AI ever since I studied at MIT in 2004 at their Artificial Intelligence Lab. I hold both a PhD and an MBA and have a passion for innovation management and entrepreneurship. Previously I worked a lot with perception for self-driving vehicles in agriculture. I founded Sensomind with my partner in 2016 in order to democratize AI and get it out to the masses.  We’ve built our own set of tools around top AI products such as Googles Tensorflow which we thought at the time were too much targetting data scientists and not enough the engineers that are out in the field today. Our core competencies lie in analysis of complex sensor data. This is available in abundance in manufacturing so is one reason why we have gotten into this industry.

Rufus Blas
Sounds interesting, but can Sensomind’s AI technology be applied on food?
We’ve been working extensively with food manufacturing customers where our technology can be used for quality monitoring and sorting of food products. Most of our solutions are based on optical sensors (Such as cameras and multi-spectral imaging). Vision technology has been around in the food industry for 10-20 years but it’s been very difficult to apply it to food products with organic shapes and high variety. Examples include monitoring breads, meat, and fruits & vegetables. With AI you can teach the system just be showing it examples which opens up for completely new applications. An example can be automating the cutting of meat.  The price of a final product has a large influence on the cutting being done correctly and it can be very difficult using traditional computer vision to recognize exactly where to cut.
And in relation to that, can Sensomind’s technology help tackle the problem of, e.g. food contamination or unapproved enhancements/additives in food?
So we have a system to detect anomalies which can for example detect contaminants. In the food industry we have used this to detect contaminants such as bone fragments, metal, plastic, and other objects which shouldn’t be there. Unlike a human operator, our system never tires. Unapproved additives is difficult to detect using traditional color cameras so here we work with spectrometers or multi-spectral cameras. Using traditional computer vision an engineer would normally sit and try to make a model for different additives based on a pre-conceived notion of what to look for. AI allows a more statistic and data-driven approach which reduces the chance of unapproved additives making it through the production undetected.
In your opinion, what role does new technologies, e.g. AI, play in creating transparency in food supply chains?
Supply chains are notoriously difficult to model because of large amounts of often poor quality or missing data. AI is really good at crunching numbers and extracting meaningful informations from poor quality and multi-source data (including images, text, numbers, etc). AI can help piece together the information about specific products which would be impossible to model by hand.
If someone was interested in learning more about the work you do, where can the find more? 
The obvious thing would be to contact me. Check out our website (sensomind.com). We have a number of international projects going so location is often not a big issue.
A big thank you to Rufus, and great to hear of the use of AI in the food supply chain. Here at MyFoodTrust, we are always looking for how new technologies can enhance transparency and traceability.
So if you know of any startups, please let me know!
Have a great day.
© MyFoodTrust 2018

Interview – Founder of bext360, Daniel Jones

I have looked so much forward to this interview.  Ever since I first read about bext360, and their use of blockchain, I have impatiently been waiting to see their work in action. So, if you are a coffee addict, and want to be sure that the coffee you drink everyday, in fact is the quality of what it is suppose to be, bext360 will have you covered. Lets get started!

Can you start with telling us a little about yourself and Bext360?I’m (Daniel Jones) a US and Africa based entrepreneur with over 17 years of experience living and working in emerging and frontier markets including China, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), and India. I have professional roots in technology, applied mathematics, electronic commerce, and emerging economies. In 1991, I was with the Defense Intelligence Agency, where I was a key architect and topology designer of the Joint Worldwide Intelligence Communications Systems (JWICS), the first and now largest TCP/IP system to transfer voice, video, and data across Top Secret networks.

After that, I spent the last five years living in Kinshasa, DRC, where I evaluated supply chains and structured/funded companies as CEO and founder of Pioneer Management. In the DRC, I founded RAMIKA, the first US-owned company to successfully export conflict-free minerals from the DRC to the US in compliance with supply chain and traceability requirements under the Dodd-Frank Act. In addition, I structured the first private port facility constructed in the DRC.

I launched bext360 in April 2017. bext360 is company that develops technologies to streamline critical supply chains in emerging economies. Although our technology can be used across industries for different commodities, we are focused on the coffee industry first. Our bext-to-brew” platform aims to revolutionize the coffee supply chain with IoT, blockchain, machine vision and artificial intelligence (more on this below), while bringing consumers and farming communities together to improve product quality, community livelihoods and the consumer coffee experience. A guiding principle of bext360 is to build community by enabling buyers and other organizations with direct paths to improve the quality of both the product and the communities that provide the coffee.

Great, but how did you first get involved with coffee supply chains?I got involved with coffee supply chain after working for years in the Democratic Republic of Congo exporting conflict-free minerals, where security necessitated by large cash transactions represented a significant expense. I saw that most were entirely inefficient and lacked so much transparency. At around the same time, I started learning about blockchain technology and I became fascinated with the idea that it could potentially transform the supply chain for many industries. I landed on coffee because it is one of the most valued commodities in the world and its supply chain is completely antiquated.

Why is there a need for better traceability and transparency of coffee supply chains?

Although coffee is the second-largest traded commodity in the world (a $150 billion market worldwide), its supply chain remains antiquated and opaque. While global demand for coffee continues to grow, farming communities in developing countries must accept low prices and delayed payments for their harvested goods (women are responsible for 70 percent of growing and harvesting). However, millennials and coffee connoisseurs are now demanding transparency for sourcing and origin – indicating a shift in consumer preference and their willingness to pay for supply chain transparency.

And in relation to that, how do Bext360 technology tackle the problem?

bext360 is helping to eliminate many of the inefficiencies of the coffee supply chain while simultaneously providing transparency at each step of the process. Using machine vision, AI and IoT along with blockchain technology, we evaluate and sort coffee cherries and parchment (a phase of coffee been processing) based on quality. Farmers are then able to use a mobile app to view payments based on coffee quality, and may offer or reject the proposed payment. They are effectively increasing compensation for higher quality cherries. Powered by Stellar’s blockchain, the application immediately pays the farmer for her product upon acceptance of the offer. The application may also connect to the farmer’s other accounts for transactions such as loan repayments, local taxes and other financial commitments. Each evaluation and transaction relating to the coffee – including farmer identification, quality, purchasers and payouts – is recorded on the blockchain providing visibility to end consumers.

The certification process in supply chains is extremely costly. Currently, inspectors must physically examine each product at every point of the supply chain to verify that the product is what it purports to be. For coffee, every batch requires certification papers to move along the supply chain from one port to the next. bext360 is moving this data to the blockchain, providing transparency and immutability, which eliminates today’s costly and sometimes unreliable paper trail.

Using blockchain technology, the bext360 platform also creates crypto tokens based on the analyzed quality of the coffee to more accurately reflect the value of this commodity. As the commodity progresses through the supply chain, new tokens are automatically created to represent the increased value of the product until it becomes the roasted coffee we know and love.

For example, when a coffee cherry enters the supply chain, a token is created to represent its quality at the first level. As it continues through the supply chain and is processed to become “green coffee”, a new token will be created at this supply chain node and exchanged with the older token to represent the commodity in its new form. This tokenization technology can be used to represent other products, such as cocoa, nuts, spices, seafood products and pharmaceuticals.

The ability to create tokens representative of commodity value is groundbreaking in many ways. All stakeholders across the supply chain can own tokens, which hold real value for financial institutions. Banks, suppliers, business owners and the machines themselves can own, pay and collect from each other seamlessly. Commodity financing, plays a significant role in the portfolios of certain financial institutions. Rabobank has welcomed the use of tokens to reduce risk, while fundamentally changing how companies interface with the bank itself. Tokenization technology drastically reduces the transaction cost of global commodities and may also be applied to inventory valuation and the development of smart contracts.

Additionally, by providing the data recorded on the blockchain to banks and microfinancing institutions, it makes financials easier to audit and assess lending risk and therefore, reduces the risk to make individual loans. On the bext360 platform record includes: how much each farmer has sold, the quality of her cherries, and how many coffee cherry trees she owns. Based on this information and her unique history, the bank may borrow against the value reflected on her blockchain record. It is an innovative solution to address ongoing limitations for the under-banked – something other startups like Tala are trying to address with alternative credit scores.

Blockchain technology can also bring consumers and farming communities together. Using the bext360 platform, eventually, consumers may tip coffee farmers directly for coffee purchased at their neighborhood coffee shop. Payments to the farmer could be made instantaneously and tracked through the blockchain’s immutable ledger to assure consumers that tips were allocated appropriately.

If someone was interested in learning more about the work you do, where can the find more?

They can visit our website, or also read about us on Fast Company and Fortune. There is also a short documentary video about our company and technology that was created by Freethink Media for their Coded Series that was sponsored by Facebook.

I believe that this combination, blockchain and on-site quality control, will help ensure transparency from start to finish, and as Dan says, bring consumers and farmers closer together.

® 2018 MyFoodTrust

By

Kristoffer Just

Interview – Tom Mueller – Author of Extra Virginity: The Sublime and Scandalous World of Olive Oil

Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO). It might not be a food product that you buy everyday, but when you buy it, it is quite expensive so you want to “the real deal”. But, far from every EVOO product on the shelf at the supermarket is actually a EVOO. Meaning, that some are of lesser quality (low-grade oils), not from the country of labelling (olives from greece, but the label says Italy) and so forth.

I used EVOO as an example in my thesis on how a new technology, blockchain, could reestablish trust, transparency and traceability in the supply chain of EVOO. And that is highly needed, especially if you (if your Danish), saw Kontant on DR last night, where they investigated Danish distributors and a Italian producer. So in relation to that, I have interviewed Tom Mueller, who has extensive knowledge about EVOO and the fraud that happens before the products are on the shelfs. So without further ado:

Can you start with telling us a little bit about yourself?

I’m Tom Mueller. I am a free-lance writer of non-fiction and fiction. I was educated at Oxford (DPhil, Rhodes Scholar), Harvard (BA, summa cum laude), and Alief Hastings High School in rural east Texas, home of the Fighting Bears. I’ve lived or worked in 48 countries.

My first book, Extra Virginity, is a New York Times best-selling account of olive oil culture, history, and crime. My articles have appeared in the New YorkerNational Geographic MagazineNew York Times Magazine and Atlantic Monthly.

What work have you done in relation to EVOO?

Truth about EVOO was born out of my love of great olive oil, and my concern about low-grade oils being passed off as “extra virgin” in the industry today, worldwide.  As a freelance writer who for the last two decades has spent much time in and around the Mediterranean, while contributing to publications including the New Yorker, Atlantic Monthly, National Geographic, and New York Times Magazine, I felt I knew olive oil well.  But it took an assignment for the New Yorker in 2007, “Slippery Business,” to make me understand the remarkable complexity of the olive oil trade, and the immense value of olive oil itself.  Since then I’ve gone steadily deeper into oil; in 2012 I published Extra Virginity, a book that explores this great foodstuff from many angles – cultural, culinary, chemical, criminal – and introduces the artisan producers and age-old landscapes of fine olive oil.

Why does fraud happen along EVOO’s supply chain?

The fraudulent behavior comes from everywhere – from misrepresenting amounts of olives brought to the mill, to various games that are played in the milling process, to blending of higher-grade extra virgin olive oil with low-grade olive oil or with other cheaper vegetable oils, to mislabeling . . .  The list is endless, as is the ingenuity of the fraudsters.

Why is it important for, us as a consumer, to have knowledge about this fraudulent behavior?

First, to ensure you are eating a healthy, tasty and genuine product, whose origin you know. Second, to make sure that honest producers get a fair price for their product – or find a market at all (they are often excluded by low-priced, fraudulent oils). Third, that you aren’t supporting fraudsters when you buy a bottle of oil.

From your knowledge, what can be done to increase traceability and transparency of EVOO products?

It is crucial to do on-site inspections and tests of mills, refineries and storage facilities, especially in ports.  So many checks are on paperwork only, not chemical testing of oils. The chemical and sensory parameters of the extra virgin grade also have to be improved (tightened) – they are currently very loose. Labels should specify the exact geographic location where olives were grown and milled, and the exact name of the producers – too often the “brand” is simply a multinational that buys and blends other peoples’ oils.

Further on that note, do you think tech can help with increasing traceability and transparency of EVOO products? And how?

Steady scientific advances in infra-red, DNA and other testing of olive oil have appeared. These need to be incorporated, rapidly, into current legislation.

What are your tips and tricks to spot that the EVOO you buy, is in fact what it is?

That is very hard to state, because there are many factors that comes into play. But I have outlined some points below, and if you want more thorough tips and tricks go to my website here.

  • Olives are stone fruits, like cherries and plums.  So real EVOO is fresh-squeezed fruit juice – seasonal, perishable, and never better than the first few weeks it was made.
  • Bitterness and pungency are usually indicators of an oil’s healthfulness. Sweetness and butteriness are often not.
  • There are 700+ different kinds of olives, which make thousands of different kinds of oil. Asking “what’s the best olive oil?” is like asking “what’s the best wine?”  The answer is, “depends on what you’re eating it with.”
  • Know the when, who, where of your oil: When it was made (harvest date), who made it (specific producer name), and exactly where on the planet they made it.

A big thank you to Tom, for his insights on this widely loved product across the globe, and why we need to keep pushing for better traceability and transparency of food products, in general.

If you want to read or know about my work on creating better traceability and transparency with tech, read this post, where I state the current supply chain process of EVOO, and how blockchain can shift the supply chain towards more transparency of the food we eat, and how farmers, producers, retailers etc, can get better traceability.

Have a great day!

© 2018 Kristoffer Just Petersen

Interview – Audit and Control Specialist, Johnny Helt

You buy your food products every day from your favorite store. Bring them home for you and your family to eat. But what you might not be aware off (and rightly so), is all the hard work that has gone before the food product lands on the shelfs. Some are working to make sure there is transparency and traceability of the food we eat. I think it is important to know how the system works now, to know what can be done to improve the transparency and traceability.

That’s why I have made this interview blog post.

One of these great people that are are trying to make sure that the food we eat, are safe to eat, is Johnny, an Audit and Control Specialist. Johnny works at COOP Trading which is a procurement company for COOP in the Nordics. I had the pleasure of interviewing Johnny as a part of my data collection for my thesis. During my thesis process I could feel his personal commitment to make sure that the food products he handles, is investigated as best as possible with the tools at hand. So here goes!

Can you start with telling us a little about yourself?

My name is Johnny Helt and I am hired in Coop Trading as Audit and Control Specialist. My primary work are audit and control, but I also process and develop tools to make our control and audits more agile and more professional. I have a bachelor in Nutrition and Home Economics and I am ISO 9001 IRCA approved lead auditor.

What is quality control and auditing, and why is it important?

Quality control and audit are the same, just with other words. As I see it, audit is also control. Control is to ensure that processes comply with the legislation, specifications, procedures and specific demands from third parties. The importance of quality control and auditing is described as a deeper investigation of the specific product or processes to ensure that it comply with the demands, if not you will get products and processes that are out of control and the outcome will fail. That’s why control and auditing are important.

Great, but how did you first get involved with quality control and auditing?

I have always been dedicated to quality control; it is part of my “way of working”. I worked in DLG (Dansk Landbrugs Grovvare Selskab) for almost 10 years, with implementing HACCP and process control.

What are your current work in relation to quality control and auditing?

My current work are to evaluate and prequalify suppliers to Coop Group, doing supplier audits all over the world (app. 50 audits a year), developing new tools to make the work with audit and control more agile, delivering input to our team, handling complaints for all countries in Coop Group, handling recalls, and a lot more.

What is the most challenging aspect of your work with quality control and auditing?

The most challenging aspect of working with control and auditing are that “things” are not always as they seem to be, and you have to be very process orientated and get into the mindset of the supplier/producer, to see and evaluate the performance of the supplier. Especially when I do traceability on the audits, I feel I have to think like “a criminal”, how could I cheat and how would I do it…. Especially on high value products (Extra Virgin Olive Oil, meat, etc.)

Building on that, from your knowledge, what can be done to create greater traceability of food products and why?

Based on the European legislation the suppliers has to trace “one forward and one backwards”. Today we live in a world where “everything” is possible and I think that revising the demands to traceability should be developed, especially on products, which are high value products. So it would be a great idea to build a system, where you also could “follow the money”, and not only the product.

This was a short glimpse of just one role “behind the scenes” of getting your food products safe and sound to the dinner table. So, thank you Johnny for this insight, and if you want to read more on supply chains and how blockchain can change it for the better, read this post.

PS: I will follow up on Johnny’s “follow the money”, on how to use blockchain as a Supply Chain Finance tool for better transparency. Stay tuned!

© 2018 Kristoffer Just Petersen

Interview – “Mr. RFID”, Henrik Granau (Part 2)

Welcome to Part 2 of my interview with Henrik Granau, or more correctly, Mr. RFID. If you haven’t read Part 1, I urge you to do that, to get a good understanding of Henrik, RFID and its challenges. Simply click here!

If you already have read Part 1, I love that you did, then you know that this part is going to focus on the opportunities with RFID within food traceability/transparency. No more small talk, let’s dive into it!

And then turning from the challenges, what are the general opportunities with RFID?

There are a lot of application areas and certain Industries where there are still obvious opportunities, but in general I believe it is in the combination with other technologies we see the huge potential;

By using RFID you create a transparency on how goods, assets etc. are flowing through your operation and if you add to this detailed information on how the workflow is actually being performed, you have established the foundation of making better decisions in your organization.

When combining these operational data with other data (‘Big Data’) and Software Robots (Artificial Intelligence), you can create new services and business models (‘disruption’).

Almost everything within the area of ‘Internet of Things’ involve wireless communication with a device which has to be uniquely identified to make sense – hence “RFID” will be ‘pervasive’.   

Building on that, from your knowledge, what are the potential of RFID tags to create greater traceability of food products and why?

Internationally we already have a number of good cases in food traceability (Fish, livestock, vegetables) with RFID and combined with temperature sensors, we have established better cold-chain management. I believe that traceability within the supply chain can still be improved, but in general the technology is in place and we have the good cases with documented results.

The challenge is that we want the consumers to be able to have the complete history of each item available on their smartphone with one scan. If it’s RFID (NFC) or 2D barcode doesn’t matter so much – the challenge is to capture all the information during the product’s lifetime automatically which is achieved by using RFID on the transportation unit. For this to work, the unique item numbers which are packed has to be associated with the unique identifier of the transportation unit, and in some areas you will then have to add some evidence that the goods hasn’t been tampered with during transportation.

So creating greater traceability is possible with RFID, but you have other issues depending on the objectives; 1) for manufacturers to issue effective recalls, 2) for consumers to check the goods before consumption, 3) for protecting against fraud, etc.  

What potential do you see in a RFID/Blockchain combination to create greater traceability of food products, from your knowledge?

I am not a blockchain specialist, but I understand that what blockchain can add is a bulletproof distributed verification mechanism. So, when the issue is to have verification that a specific organization is guaranteeing that their part of the traceability data are valid, then you could use blockchain to lock a certain ‘hand-over’ transaction with some associated data. If RFID is used then this process could be done automatically at choke points. As an anti-counterfeit method.

I believe I can learn more about the potential with RFID/Blockchain by being kept updated on your progress.

If someone was interested in RFID, what would be a few things you would suggest to investigate further?

I will start with recommending to vist www.rfididk.org. This is RFID I Danmark’s website where we have tried to give a good introduction to RFID – especially through cases and slides from presentations held at our conferences.

As a special service the RFID I Danmark Association is offering that anyone for free can contact me with initial questions. You can mail me at henrik@rfididk.dk or you can call me at +45 21 832 835.

Thank you to Henrik, for his great insights into RFID and the opportunities. From this and what I learned from the RFID in Denmark conference, I see great potential for a RFID/Blockchain solution in supply chains. RFID will secure correct data inputs, which can’t be tampered or adulterated, which then are data inputs for the immutable blocks in the blockchain application.

One of the key takeaways from the conference, was the lack of adoption and their one-sided focus on RFID being a inventory solution, and not grasping a more holistic picture of what the tech can do. And I feel that, that is a general thing when investigating new technologies, that it is very one-sided and not trying to connect all the dots.

Thank you reading, have a great day!

© 2017 Kristoffer Just Petersen

Interview – “Mr. RFID”, Henrik Granau (Part 1)

As the second interview post I wanted to, hopefully, expand your knowledge about what tech can help with better traceability and transparency of food products. One of these tech’s is RFID. RFID is not new to scene of tech developments, but maybe looking to be a “revival”, due to its capabilities for easy tracking and tracing of products. So if you want to learn about RFID, from Mr. RFID himself, you have to read this.

I had the pleasure of meeting Henrik at the RFID in Denmark conference at IT University in Copenhagen this summer. I had touched upon RFID during the writing of my master thesis, and wanted to learn more about it’s potential in retail, and to know about where we are in terms of adoption by companies. To get those learnings, you have to read part 2. But for now, lets talk about RFID, here goes!

Can you start with telling us a little about yourself?

Well, I am what you would call an experienced executive, having conducted most of my career in international IT Companies, where I have developed my strategic outlook and knowledge for the successful Marketing, Selling and Implementation of high level and complex business solutions.

I was originally an IT Expert working with development of large complex IT Systems. As an example, I was Project Manager for the development of the world first distributed real time trading system for Financial Instruments (for Copenhagen Stock-Exchange 1986-1988).  Since 1990 it has been General Management at C-level.

What are RFID technology and why is it important?

RFID is an abbreviation for Radio Frequency Identification – using radio waves to identify objects or people. This could be done on very long distances (Satelites, GPS etc.) and on very short distances (Access to buildings, wireless payments etc.). Some Frequency bands are in the regulation allocated to RFID use and a lot of people only perceive these as “RFID”, but in my definition it is everything using radio waves to identify – including WiFi, Bluetooth etc.

When RFID back in 2004-2005 was hyped as the next big thing – the replacement of barcodes – it was however very much focused on what we call “passive RFID”, where the term ‘passive’ means no power source on the RFID Tag itself (no battery). A passive RFID Tag is a very simple microchip with an antenna and only when it is in the proximity of an RFID Reader the chip is powered up (by the radio waves from the Reader) and it can do very limited operations, such as telling it’s unique Identifier.

Different RFID Tags

Passive RFID Tags are now standardized and the prices has decreased to a level where it really make good sense to attach RFID Tags to single items. Because of the lack of battery, the lifetime of an RFID Tag can be considered like ‘forever’.

The technology is used across Industries and in a lot of different application areas. You can track a product throughout it’s entire lifetime establishing complete transparency in your business operation. Examples are Library books, Fashion clothes, containers, airplane parts etc. etc.

We have thousands of successful implementations – the technology is working and the cost is justified through achieved business benefits – but a lot of organizations have never learned about the technology in relation to their operation.

Great, but how did you first get involved with RFID?

I was introduced to RFID when I accepted the challenge to be heading a Danish start-up company, RFIDsec in 2005 – a company with a mission to set new standards for security and privacy in RFID. We developed our own security features at the chip level as well as at the solution level with end-to-end control. Unfortunately we had to close RFIDsec in 2010, but all our features are now a part of the new international standards which were finalized in 2015.

During my 5 years as CEO for RFIDsec (2005-2010), I established my international network within the RFID world – because I had to get involved in all formal as well as informal standardization activities around security and privacy issues with RFID technology.

I was a co-founder of the RACE Network (Racing Awareness and Competitiveness in Europe) who was advising the EU Commission in RFID matters 2008-2011. The RACE Network was later renamed to ‘RFID in Europe’.

What are your current work in relation to RFID?

In 2010 I founded the thematic network “RFID i Danmark” where I am still putting a lot of time and effort into nursing the initiative. Every year we are organizing the largest RFID Event in the Nordic countries – the 7´th of its kind was held in Copenhagen at the IT University on June 14’th 2017.

In the network I am known as “Mr. RFID” and since 2014 I have also taken on the challenge to build up a strong organization in the Nordic countries for AIM Global. I am also Vice Chairman of the Board at AIM Europe.

In addition to the networking activities, I work as an independent Management Consultant where most of my activities are in the area of tracking, tracing and locating.

I help companies select the most appropriate technologies and standards to their usage and keep myself updated on the technological development through a good relationship with the manufacturers and resellers of RFID products.

I am the guy who knows what is going on internationally and nationally within the area of RFID.

What is the most challenging for a general RFID adoption at the moment?

Well, in general Supply Chain Management, in Fashion clothes and apparel, in Libraries, in ticketing, access cards etc. I believe that we on an international level actually has reached ‘general RFID adoption’. If you look at the hype created back in 2004-2005, where RFID was predicted to be a general replacement of barcodes, though I will still state that this will never happen with the current silicon based RFID technology. It just doesn’t make sense to put RFID tags on each item of bubble gum, milk etc. – the total cost of attaching an RFID Label is still 30-40 times the cost of using a traditional barcode.

Across Industries I would however still claim that lack of knowledge is the most important reason for not implementing RFID.

Want to read about the opportunities that Henrik sees with RFID in supply chains? RFID’s possibility to create better traceability in food products? And Henrik’s thoughts on a RFID/Blockchain combination to greater traceability in food products?

Then stay tuned for part 2 next week!

© 2017 Kristoffer Just Petersen